Don’t Let Cleveland Art Get Trumped

The United State of Cleveland: Bringing national issues close to home

To be in Cleveland is to love its art and artists.

Think of how Cleveland art makes you feel when you’re sitting in front of a screen at the Cleveland International Film Festival, laughing or crying because a filmmaker from thousands of miles away somehow knew exactly what you needed to see in this moment. Or rushing to get a drink at XYZ before you support an internationally acclaimed playwright at Cleveland Public Theatre.  Or even quieting the kids during your morning drive because you can’t wait to tell off a problematic panelist on “The Sound of Ideas.”

Like every city in America, Cleveland is not Cleveland without its art and culture. Cleveland is not Cleveland without its truth tellers. As someone who loves Cleveland arts and is a Cleveland creator, I hope you’ll consider a single request:  Don’t take our arts and culture for granted. In fact, get so frightened about the thought of them diluting or disappearing that you get angry and get active.

[bctt tweet=”Like every city in America, Cleveland is not Cleveland without its art and culture. Cleveland is not Cleveland without its truth tellers.” username=”GoodCauseCLE “]

The current administration’s proposed budget calls for the elimination of The National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

What does this mean for Cleveland?

The National Endowment of the Arts awarded $10,000 for this year’s Cleveland Film Festival and $20,000 to premiere “I Call My Brothers” at Cleveland Public Theatre. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting provides support for Ideastream, the local producer of public broadcasting and NPR programming—which would be devastated by the proposed cuts.

Cleveland is a city where arts and culture matter; where the writing, singing, clapping, and painting of our people tell rich stories that artists and journalists won’t let us forget.

[bctt tweet=”Cleveland is a city where arts and culture matter; where the writing, singing, clapping, and painting of our people tell rich stories that artists and journalists won’t let us forget.” username=”GoodCauseCLE”]

National politicians can keep people at the extremes of being disengaged and overwhelmed—speaking in vague generalities that make processing local ramifications impossible.

Don’t let Cleveland arts be a victim of this phenomenon.

  1. Share this resource with your friends and let them know what we’d be missing in 2017 without the National Endowment of the Arts.

  2. Contact our representatives using this list from the Ohio Humanities. Let state officials know you will be watching to see if they fight for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

  3. Support local art and journalism. Buy tickets. Get subscriptions. Visit exhibits. Reinforce the need for the arts and humanities by supporting them.

We need programs that support the arts because the arts make us consider the state of our world. Without the easels and pens of artists, we would lose our national conscious.

Pay attention, Cleveland. Some of our most valuable resources are depending on us.

Image copyright: PapaBear / 123RF Stock Photo

Share on Social

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on pinterest

Newsletter

Looking for stories that challenge, change and inspire? We've got you covered. Never miss a post!
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Keep in Touch

WISH Cleveland Leadership Center